Arnold Leese

AZL flag holder TransparentArnold LeeseArnold Spencer Leese (1878–1956) was a British politician and veterinarian. He is recognised as a leading authority on the camel and a camel parasite, Thelazia leesei was named after him. Realising the Jewish control of money and identifying the Jewish practice of kashrut slaughter as barbaric influenced Leese. He led his own fascist movement-the Imperial Fascist League and was a prolific author and publisher both before and after the Second World War. Leese was one of two fascist councillors elected at Stamford in Lincolnshire in 1924. In 1932 Oswald Mosley approached Leese with the aim of absorbing the IFL into his own British Union of Fascists and, whilst relations between the two men were initially cordial, Leese quickly attacked Mosley for his failure to deal with the “Jewish question”, eventually labelling Mosley’s group as “kosher fascists“. Jewish Ritual Murder (AZL Cut)By 1935 Leese was already revealing the truth about Jewish ritual murder for which he was convicted and jailed for six months by Jews and collaborators. Leese was one of the last leaders of the fascist movement to be interned in the United Kingdom at the beginning of World War II under the Defence Regulation 18B and rightly saw the war as a “Jew’s War” manipulated as it was by Jews. He was released from detention in 1944 on health grounds following a major operation and Soon after WWII set up his own “Jewish Information Bureau” to publish his own journal, Gothic Ripples. This was deeply race realist largely exposing the Jews but with a strong warning against other non-white races. Leese returned to prison in 1947 when, along with seven other former members of the IFL, he was given a one year sentence for helping escaped German prisoners of war who had been members of the Waffen SS. In 1951, he published his autobiography Out of Step: Events in the Two Lives of an Anti-Jewish Camel Doctor.
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“When William Joyce was brought back a prisoner to England, I offered, if he thought fit to defend himself by justifying his actions, to give evidence about the Jewish menace; but he took a different line. I had only actually met him once; there can be no doubt that he took the wrong action in the war, but he believed himself justified in what he did, and he died like a hero.” – Arnold Leese – ‘Out of Step’ Chapter XIII

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